New to Archery

So I guess this is the start of my blog…

Let’s start with equipment…

First time buying and what you need to do first before taking the “big dive”.

Usually by the end of my first intro to archery lessons (sometimes before we even start), I am asked how much does archery cost…
It’s a good question but very difficult to answer. My professional gear has set me back at least $10,000 USD not including spares and extra’s. My traditional longbow is only around the $500 USD mark. With such a large discrepancy where do we start?

First let’s go through what you need to know even before you want to make a purchase…

1. Take lessons
I know this sounds self serving, but in the end taking lessons from a reputable instructor / coach will save you hard earned coin in the end. Please do not buy equipment then rock up to an archery range expecting everything to be awesome and your inner Katniss or Hawkeye will just take over. The truth is archery is a lil’ more complicated than it looks. Proper form will save you undo injuries, broken equipment and frustration. Starting with a low poundage bow (less pull on the string), and gradually moving up is extremely helpful.

2. Olympic, Compound or Traditional?
Start with Olympic in other words a takedown recurve bow. Hopefully you start off with my first suggestion and take lessons where they teach with a good quality low poundage recurve bow. Why you ask? Well again in my opinion… learning first on a recurve gives you all the basics you require to shoot competently in all disciplines of archery. Some folks would argue with me and that’s fine (be that way…) After the basics the differences are basically adding to or subtracting from what was first learned on the recurve. It’s not quite as simple as all that since being proficient in each discipline is a feat onto it’s own, but the analogy still holds true. So what gets added or subtracted to an archers form? What are the different disciplines?

Olympic
With a good basic instruction the archer will have learned everything from stance right through to using a finger/wrist sling while not holding the bow. This is basically everything you would require for your Olympic style of shooting. (Not much to learn or unlearn here.)
An Olympic setup is just that… equipment that is permitted for shooting at the Olympic Games.
This consists of a Take-down Bow with limbs and a riser, a simple sight (no magnification), a simple draw check device such as a clicker, a stabilization system (long rod, side rods, vibration units), a finger tab, finger/wrist sling and an arm guard. Some archers use a unit on the string to locate an area on the mouth to help with a consistent anchor called a kisser.

More tomorrow… got a lesson to teach…